Excessively Strange

I will judge you silently

101,200 notes

princesswitchy:

My whole family assumes I’m straight and it’s like if I say anything like “wow that girl is so pretty” they’re like “you’re pretty too don’t compare yourself’ like no mom the only thing I’m comparing is the width between her legs and how well I could fit.

(via worthyourweightinfanfiction)

54,682 notes

sursumursa:

madmaudlingoes:

jethroq:

pterobat:

naamahdarling:

did-you-kno:

Source

Wolves fighting for dominance as a “thing” came from observation of captive packs.  Observation of genuinely wild packs has revealed that it is not, in fact, a “thing.”

Y’hear that, ya dumbass modern werewolf writers?

hear that, self-styled “alpha males”?

They weren’t even captive packs, they were a bunch of unrelated wolves shoved together in too-small a space.

So if you’re an ‘alpha wolf’ then you are, in point of fact, not the noble, fierce and imposing leader of a group who respects you, but a scared wild creature with no social support frantically lashing out at strangers to try and gain some semblance of control over a fundamentally uncontrollable environment?
Huh.
That would explain a few things.

sursumursa:

madmaudlingoes:

jethroq:

pterobat:

naamahdarling:

did-you-kno:

Source

Wolves fighting for dominance as a “thing” came from observation of captive packs.  Observation of genuinely wild packs has revealed that it is not, in fact, a “thing.”

Y’hear that, ya dumbass modern werewolf writers?

hear that, self-styled “alpha males”?

They weren’t even captive packs, they were a bunch of unrelated wolves shoved together in too-small a space.

So if you’re an ‘alpha wolf’ then you are, in point of fact, not the noble, fierce and imposing leader of a group who respects you, but a scared wild creature with no social support frantically lashing out at strangers to try and gain some semblance of control over a fundamentally uncontrollable environment?

Huh.

That would explain a few things.

(via that-weird-artist-kid)

Filed under general knowledge

134,732 notes

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via fatnutritionist)

Filed under reference

1,374 notes

Growing up, I didn’t read novels by women. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s almost like I didn’t think that I needed to or, I guess, I didn’t know that I needed to. I was perfectly happy in a world contained by men. I adopted the posture of the brooding male as my own. I was Salinger, I was Kerouac, I was any male protagonist in a novel that one of my boyfriends recommended. I didn’t know that there was a specific female sadness so I was content with relating to a generalized one. And in a way, reading these novels was less of a way to relate and more of a way to learn how to be the type of girl that these male novelists liked. One of my first ambitions wasn’t to be a writer – it was to be a writer’s muse.
Gabby Bess, in Dazed (via boyhands)

(Source: electric-cereal, via fatnutritionist)

Filed under for faith important

5 notes

Anonymous asked: Can you give some tips on building a memory palace? I've tried that method but it never seems to work for me.

genericappblrurl:

Sure thing! It also helps to read this wikipedia page and possibly this book if you’re still curious/want to read more in depth

For beginners, it’s best to practice by mentally walking around a familiar place, like your home, neighborhood, or school, and “placing” very specific items around this location. Do this with a few shopping lists or something similar to get used to the feeling. 

When you’re pretty comfortable and able to visualize easily, you can begin to create a space of your own. It can be literally anything, but building does take time. Always get comfortable with your existing space before adding onto it; this won’t work if you have to struggle to remember the layout! 

You can’t just “imagine” a room; you have to actually “walk around” in it. Familiarize yourself with your space. Go there whenever you can. Place a few arbitrary objects in it and visit them. Become as familiar with the setup as you are in your own home.

I’ve found that this is best done in silence, but if ambient noise or music helps you think then go for it. Just be aware that this noise or music may get incorporated into your mental map, so make sure it’s something you like!

That’s about all I can tell you, but practice is definitely the way to become more comfortable with it. Good luck!

Filed under for faith for later